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Mobile Hacker Stephen Ryner Jr. is also known as @nuthatch

Archive

Mar
11th
Fri
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Dec
17th
Fri
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It took over a year, but I finally did it. My first iPhone app in the app store: Electric Miles for dailymile, an awesome site for athletes to share their workouts and motivation.

It took over a year, but I finally did it. My first iPhone app in the app store: Electric Miles for dailymile, an awesome site for athletes to share their workouts and motivation.

Dec
13th
Mon
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"There are many apps in the app store. How hard can it be?"

Sep
3rd
Fri
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The easiest way to upgrade a Mobile Provision in Xcode.

The easiest way to upgrade a Mobile Provision in Xcode.

Jul
8th
Thu
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OAuthConsumer on GitHub

rentzsch:

I extracted mostly-Jon-Crosby’s Obj-C 2 OAuth implementation into its own GitHub project and rolled in my various fixes.

Patches welcome.

Jul
4th
Sun
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H264: cannot locate bundle “com.apple.QuickTimeH264.component” => bailing out!

Here’s another hair-puller for future Google searches. My brand-new MacBook Pro inherited a problem from my old MacBook Pro: videos shot on my iPhone would lock up QuickTime Pro. No quicklook previews. No iPhoto.  Trying to watch would play audio and then show the Rainbow Spinning Wheel of Doom.

A quick look at the Console logs showed messages like this:

7/4/10 4:05:33 PM [0x0-0x2e92e9].com.apple.quicktimeplayer[6860] H264: cannot locate bundle “com.apple.QuickTimeH264.component” => bailing out!

If you google this particular expression, you won’t find anything. Boo!

I wasted some time trying to fix a broken folder (not a bundle!) named QuickTimeH264.component in ~/Library/Quicktime. Then I had an epiphany and simply deleted the offending folder. 

Portrait video from iPhone now plays correctly. I’m assuming the broken QuickTimeH264.component was leftover from QuickTime Pro or some other component before Snow Leopard was released.

Jul
2nd
Fri
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Jun
27th
Sun
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“A valid signing identity matching this profile could not be found on your keychain”

Once a year your iPhone Development Certificate expires and you have to to the Certificate Hamster Dance. It’s easy to request and install a new certificate (“developer_identity.cer”), but you must edit your existing provisioning profiles on the program portal to refer to the new certificate, then update and download each provisioning profile as well.

In hindsight, it makes sense. Your old provisioning profile (e.g. “nuthatch.mobileprovision”) refers to a developer certificate you just replaced. So that signing identity can no longer be found. The new profile includes the new certificate, and all is good again. For now.

It’s a shame the error messages are so useless. I understand this is all fixed in Xcode 4.0 but googling the phrase “A valid signing identity matching this profile could not be found on your keychain” returns a lot of noise. The final hint (duh!) came from http://bit.ly/valid-signing-identity

Jun
9th
Wed
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May
15th
Sat
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